• Anúncios

Segundo satélite Galileu quase a ser lançado...

"Reviews", anúncios, dúvidas sobre receptores de GPS

Moderador: Moderadores

Segundo satélite Galileu quase a ser lançado...

Mensagempor rifkind » quinta mar 06, 2008 15:08

http://news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/science/nature/7278616.stm

Giove-B, the second demonstrator spacecraft for Europe's proposed satellite navigation system, is finally to be sent for launch.

The craft, currently held at a test centre in Holland, will be despatched to the Baikonur spaceport next week for a Soyuz flight in late April.

Giove-B will trial key technologies for the Galileo project, including the most advanced atomic clock to go into orbit.

[...]

At one stage, Giove-B was being built in parallel with Giove-A, the first test platform launched in December 2005.

But the former's preparation was then hit by lengthy delays, including a major setback when a component blew on the spacecraft whilst it was sitting in a thermal vacuum chamber designed to assess the satellite's ability to withstand the extreme conditions of space.

[...]

After the repairs and modifications, Giove-B would have been ready for flight in December 2007, but has since had to wait for a rocket to become available to take it into space.

[...]

The sat-nav venture came close to being cancelled last year when the private consortium selected to build and operate the system collapsed.

European Union finance ministers had to step in with a 3.4bn-euro public funding package to keep Galileo alive.

Galileo cannot truly proceed until the money is released, and that requires the formal agreement of the EU's legislative arms.

[...]

The launch on a Soyuz-Fregat vehicle is timed for 2316 on Saturday, 26 April. Giove-B will be placed in a medium-Earth orbit 23,222km above the planet's surface.

It should begin its first transmissions in May.

Giove-A, produced by the UK firm Surrey Satellite Technology Limited, has worked flawlessly in orbit for two years.
rifkind
Site Admin
 
Mensagens: 1340
Registado: terça jun 24, 2003 18:32

Mensagempor Limao » quinta mar 06, 2008 22:08

Desculpem-me a ignorância sobre este assunto, mas traduzindo para miúdos, o que é nos vai trazer na prática? Isto é bom ou mau?...
Limao
Small
 
Mensagens: 138
Registado: sexta mar 18, 2005 01:58

Mensagempor danieloliveira » sexta mar 07, 2008 12:37

Limao Escreveu:Desculpem-me a ignorância sobre este assunto, mas traduzindo para miúdos, o que é nos vai trazer na prática? Isto é bom ou mau?...


The Galileo is a planned Global Navigation Satellite System, to be built by the European Union (EU) and European Space Agency (ESA). The €3.4 billion project is an alternative and complementary to the U.S. Global Positioning System (GPS) and the Russian GLONASS. On November 30, 2007 the 27 EU transportation ministers involved reached an agreement that it should be operational by 2013.[1]

When in operation, it will have two ground operations centers, one near Munich, Germany, and another in Fucino, near Rome, Italy.[2] Since 18 May 2007, at the recommendation of Transport Commissioner Jacques Barrot, the EU took direct control of the Galileo project from the private sector group of eight companies called European Satellite Navigation Industries, which had abandoned this Galileo project in early 2007.

Galileo is intended to provide: more precise measurements to all users than available through GPS or GLONASS, better positioning services at high latitudes, and an independent positioning system upon which European nations can rely even in times of war or political disagreement. Named for the Italian astronomer Galileo Galilei, the positioning system is referred to as "Galileo" instead of by the abbreviation "GPS" to distinguish it from the U.S. system.

Não sou eu que o digo...... :D
If you really must know, then click below:
http://img.geocaching.com/stats/img.asp ... 93eae3ea8f
Avatar do Utilizador
danieloliveira
Large
 
Mensagens: 1201
Registado: sexta dez 26, 2003 09:12
Localização: Alpha Centauri

Mensagempor Limao » sexta mar 07, 2008 12:57

Ok... :roll:

Só mais umas perguntinhas...

Os nossos aparelhos que usamos no nosso desporto altamente competitivo também poderão funcionar com o Galileu? Ou teremos que ter dois aparelhos se quisermos usufruir deste novo sistema satélite?

:?: :?: :?: :?: :?: :?: :?: :?: :?: :?: :?: :?:
Limao
Small
 
Mensagens: 138
Registado: sexta mar 18, 2005 01:58

Mensagempor truta » sexta mar 07, 2008 14:20

Os nossos GPSr não vão funcionar com o Galileu mas já estão a ser desenvolvidos equipamentos que funcionam com os dois sistemas.

Quanto à primeira questão o Galileu é bom porque é mais preciso e porque ficamos independentes do sistema GPS que é americano.
Por outro lado é mau porque estes argumentos são muito discutíveis para os biliões que se vão gastar. Vai-se fazer um sistema semelhante ao existente sendo altamente improvável que o GPS volte a deixar de estar disponível.
truta
Regular
 
Mensagens: 602
Registado: quinta abr 27, 2006 23:47
Localização: Setúbal

Mensagempor TMPinho » sexta mar 07, 2008 14:37

Boas,
Daquilo que li, não vai servir só para obtermos as posições (lat,long, alt, vel.).
Vai servir para enviar conteúdos, é do género estamos a chegar a um sítio e é enviada informação (tipo: bombas, restaurantes, museus, trânsito, etc.) desse local.
Isso foi o que li no inicio do projecto Galileu. Não sei se entretanto com estas alterações todas, houve alguma mudança.
Abraço :)
Avatar do Utilizador
TMPinho
Regular
 
Mensagens: 657
Registado: terça jun 26, 2007 22:27
Localização: Moledo / Braga / Águeda

Mensagempor btrodrigues » sábado mar 08, 2008 00:12

TMPinho Escreveu:Boas,
Daquilo que li, não vai servir só para obtermos as posições (lat,long, alt, vel.).
Vai servir para enviar conteúdos, é do género estamos a chegar a um sítio e é enviada informação (tipo: bombas, restaurantes, museus, trânsito, etc.) desse local.
Isso foi o que li no inicio do projecto Galileu. Não sei se entretanto com estas alterações todas, houve alguma mudança.
Abraço :)


nah.
nada disso. que granda salsada que para aí vai. não faz sentido nenhum

What is GALILEO?
GALILEO is a global navigation infrastructure under civil control. It will consist of 30 satellites, the associated ground infrastructure and regional/local augmentations.

Why is there any need for GALILEO when we already have GPS?
GALILEO will ensure European economies' from independence from other states’ systems, which could deny access to civil users at any time, and to enhance safety and reliability. The only systems currently in existence are the United States Global Positioning Service (GPS) and the Russian GLONASS system, both military but made available to civil users without any guarantee for continuity.
Important macro-economic benefits will be derived from GALILEO, in particular through achieving a European share in the equipment market, efficiency savings for industry as well as social benefits e.g. through cheaper transport, reduced congestion and less pollution.
Above that, with it's open service at least offering the same performances as GPS by the time of GALILEO's deployment, GALILEO will offer also value added services with integrity provision and, in some cases, service guarantees, based on a certifiable system.

#

Why should I pay for GALILEO, when GPS is free?
Like GPS, GALILEO will be free of charge to basic users (open service). Some applications will have to be paid for - those requiring a quality of service which GPS is unable to provide. The GPS of the future could perhaps offer such services too, but there is no guarantee that they will be free, least of all if GPS would hold a monopoly. In any case, GPS will remain a system conceived primarily for military applications.
#

Will existing GPS receivers be able to use GALILEO?
Negotiations with U.S. administration are currently focusing on the shared use of certain frequency bands. The future for the navigation receiver user should be seen in the combined GPS / GALILEO receiver that will be capable of computing signals from both contellations (GPS + Galileo). This will provide for the best possible performance, accuracy and reliability. However, since Galileo will not be available before 2008, current GPS-receivers will most probaly not be able to receive Galileo-signals. It remains to be seen if industry will be able to provide software-updates, for example. On the other hand, given the advance in technological development, today's GPS-receivers would probably anyway be outdated in 5 or 6 years from now. It should also be noted that, as GPS is foreseen to evolve, "old GPS-reveivers" will face the same difficulties with future upgraded GPS-signals.



etc etc etc

(tirado daqui: http://ec.europa.eu/dgs/energy_transpor ... dex_en.htm )
--
BR
Avatar do Utilizador
btrodrigues
Extra Large
 
Mensagens: 1938
Registado: quinta mai 08, 2003 21:38

Mensagempor Bringer » terça abr 22, 2008 21:36

Acabei de ver uma notícia no Telejornal da RTP2 que os fundos foram finalmente desbloqueados e que o 2º satélite irá ser lançado no próximo domingo.

A previsão para a total operacionalidade do sistema é 2013.
Imagem
Bringer
Large
 
Mensagens: 1008
Registado: sábado jul 14, 2007 00:00
Localização: Lisboa

Mensagempor Malok0 » terça abr 22, 2008 23:51

recuso-me a tecer qualquer comentário seja no sentido depreciativo ou vice-versa. 8)
Ainda é cedo para dizer se o GPS ficará sobrelotado e com a sustentabilidade em risco, e se o Galileo uma boa opção.
Avatar do Utilizador
Malok0
Regular
 
Mensagens: 338
Registado: domingo jan 21, 2007 01:18

Mensagempor Bringer » quarta abr 23, 2008 09:07

Malok0 Escreveu:recuso-me a tecer qualquer comentário seja no sentido depreciativo ou vice-versa. 8)
Ainda é cedo para dizer se o GPS ficará sobrelotado e com a sustentabilidade em risco, e se o Galileo uma boa opção.


O GPS em uso normal nunca ficará sobrelotado pois baseia-se apenas na recepção dos sinais de satélite. Com mais ou menos receptores de GPS em utilização a quantidade de informação processada por cada satélite é a mesma.

Em relação a emissores de GPS não sei como o sistema funciona...
Imagem
Bringer
Large
 
Mensagens: 1008
Registado: sábado jul 14, 2007 00:00
Localização: Lisboa

Mensagempor vsergio » quinta abr 24, 2008 11:47

[url=http://veraoverdeorg.blogspot.com/2008/04/o-erro-do-gps-selective-availability.html]O erro do GPS: Selective Availability
do Verão Verde de Nuno M. Cabeçadas
[/url]
Durante anos, a precisão do GPS foi afectada pela introdução de um factor de erro, destinado a diminuir a sua precisão, mas a introdução de diversas tecnologias e a cada vez maior disseminação de receptores a nível mundial acabou por ditar o fim desta medida.

A 02 de Maio de 2000, pelas 05:05 MEZ, a introdução de erros designada por Selective Availability (SA) foi desligada, do que resultou o fim do erro deliberado que desviava a posição real até aos 50 ou mesmo aos 150 metros.

Este erro era introduzido através da adulteração do valor do sinal L1 transmitido pelo satélite e destinava-se a prevenir o uso do GPS como instrumento capaz de ser usado em ataques terroristas, afectando unicamente os receptores de uso civil.

Obviamente, existia a possibilidade de ultrapassar este erro, recorrendo a GPS diferenciais, ou DGPS, que usam uma estação base fixa, de posicionamento conhecido para permanentemente aferir os erros e introduzir o valor de correcção, obtendo assim uma posição extremamente precisa.

Os mais recentes equipamentos, com o integrado SiRF 3, capazes de receber informação de 20 satélites, para além de funcionarem em situações de difícil recepção, com a implementação de sistemas como o Wide Area Augmentation System (WAAS) ou o European Geostationary Navigation Overlay Service (EGNOS) oferecem uma margem de erros de poucos metros, suficientes para uma navegação precisa na maioria das situações.

A precisão do GPS e a conclusão da rede do sistema de navegação russo Glonass, que após anos de estagnação foi retomada e poderá vir a ser rentabilizado através da disponibilização do sinal de satélite para fins comerciais, são factores que devem ser tidos em conta quando se avalia a viabilidade económica do Galileo, cujos atrasos e constantes dificuldades financeiras não permitem prever nem a sua conclusão, nem o posicionamento no mercado.
Avatar do Utilizador
vsergio
Extra Large
 
Mensagens: 2309
Registado: segunda set 19, 2005 21:52
Localização: Sobral Monte Agraço

Mensagempor bockyPT » segunda abr 28, 2008 22:15

O segundo satélite já se encontra em órbita: http://science.slashdot.org/article.pl? ... 28/1827244
Imagem
Avatar do Utilizador
bockyPT
Regular
 
Mensagens: 341
Registado: segunda abr 11, 2005 19:54
Localização: Pontinha/Odivelas

China Beidou

Mensagempor rifkind » quinta mai 08, 2008 09:21

http://www.space.com/businesstechnology ... eidou.html

Chinese satellite navigation officials say they intend to field an operational system covering all of Asia by 2010, but they are giving few details on the deployment plans for their global system. In addition China has yet to complete frequency coordination with the United States, Europe, Russia and others.

In presentations April 23 here at the Toulouse Space Show, these Chinese officials nonetheless said their global Compass/Beidou system would be fully compatible with the U.S. GPS, European Galileo and Russian Glonass global navigation constellations.

Like GPS, Galileo and Glonass, Beidou/Compass would be free of direct user charges but also feature an encrypted signal for authorized users only, presumably including the Chinese military.

[...]
rifkind
Site Admin
 
Mensagens: 1340
Registado: terça jun 24, 2003 18:32

Re: China Beidou

Mensagempor Bringer » quinta mai 08, 2008 09:46

rifkind Escreveu:http://www.space.com/businesstechnology/080505-busmon-china-beidou.html

Chinese satellite navigation officials say they intend to field an operational system covering all of Asia by 2010, but they are giving few details on the deployment plans for their global system. In addition China has yet to complete frequency coordination with the United States, Europe, Russia and others.

In presentations April 23 here at the Toulouse Space Show, these Chinese officials nonetheless said their global Compass/Beidou system would be fully compatible with the U.S. GPS, European Galileo and Russian Glonass global navigation constellations.

Like GPS, Galileo and Glonass, Beidou/Compass would be free of direct user charges but also feature an encrypted signal for authorized users only, presumably including the Chinese military.

[...]


Qualquer há tanto satélite no espaço que nem se vê o sol... :P
Imagem
Bringer
Large
 
Mensagens: 1008
Registado: sábado jul 14, 2007 00:00
Localização: Lisboa

Mensagempor lopesco » quinta mai 08, 2008 09:49

Já há pouco lixo lá em cima, há....
Imagem
Avatar do Utilizador
lopesco
Extra Large
 
Mensagens: 1712
Registado: segunda Oct 10, 2005 12:51
Localização: Abóboda, Cascais

Próximo

Voltar para Dispositivos GPS

Quem está ligado:

Utilizador a ver este Fórum: Nenhum utilizador registado e 1 visitante

cron